TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 5/PART 2  EXPLORING SPACE, ACTION, AND STORY

THE ADVENT OF ACTION

“The Original Truly Narrative Genre”

The Chase as Attraction and “Mini-Spectacle”:

Figure 5.18: The “Mini-Spectacular Chase”

Contiguous Spaces and Multiple Shots

Some Generic Uses of Action

Direct Cuts and Contiguous Spaces: Daring Daylight Burglary

Figure 5.19: Action in Unified Space

Visual Cues and Excess Time: Desperate Poaching Affray

Some Lessons in Spatial Coherence

Figure 5.20: Contiguous Spaces and Spatial Coherence

What to Do about Dead Time

Expanding Space from the Reverse Angle

Figure 5.21: Managing Space from the Spectator's Point of View
Figure 5.22: The Logistics of the Reverse Angle
Figure 5.23: Shooting Real Time and Space
Figure 5.24: The Pan Shot: Preserving Spatial Integrity

Space, Action, and Syntax

The Possibilities of Parallel Editing: A Narrow Escape

Figure 5.25: Crosscutting on the Melodramatic

Applying Crosscutting to Movement: Rescued by Rover

Figure 5.26: The Coherent Visual Narrative

“The First Dramatically Creative American Film”: The Great Train Robbery

Figure 5.27: The Great Train Robbery (I)
Figure 5.28: The Great Train Robbery (II)

The Effect of Omitting the Inessential

Nonlinear Representation

Figure 5.29: The Great Train Robbery (III)
Figure 5.30: The Great Train Robbery (IV)

A Little Technological Virtuosity

Figure 5.31: The Great Train Robbery (V)
Figure 5.32: The Logistics of the In-Camera Matte

GLOSSARY

REFERENCES

Reading 5.3: In Theory: “Making Some Sense of an Ending”

Figure R5.4: The Story as Mere Gag

Biographical Sketch 5.1: Cecil Hepworth

Figure B5.1: The Arc-Lit Interior
Figure B5.2: The Topical Series
Figure B5.3: Cue the Canine
Figure B5.4: To Edit or Not to Edit
Figure B5.5: Composing Tableaux

Reading 5.4: In Theory: “You Don’t Need to Show Everything”: Actuality Filmmaking and the Development of Editing

Figure R5.4: Editing the Actuality (I)
Figure R5.5: Editing the Actuality (II)

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