TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 7/PART 2  FROM VAUDEVILLE TO THE NICKELODEON

THE QUESTION OF A CRISIS

The “Chaser Theory”

Figure 7.10: Vaudeville: The Standard in Exhibition Practices

The White Rats Strike

Supply and Demand in the Variety-Show Business

Figure 7.11: Outdoor Vaudeville, Coney Island, New York

The Toll Taken by Litigation

Disputes over Patents: Edison v. American Mutoscope

Figure 7.12: Round One Goes to Edison

Conflict over Copyrights: Edison v. Lubin

Figure 7.13: The First Motion-Picture Copyright
Figure 7.14: Paper Print Rolls

Visual Intelligibility and Virtual Inertia

An Upsurge of Imports

“No Moving-Picture Show Is Considered Complete without Pathé Pictures”

The Collapse of Edison’s Quality Strategy

Supplying the “Feature Film”

Domestic Features

Figure 7.15: Filmed Theater as Feature Film
Figure 7.16: The Commercial Option
Figure 7.17: What’s So Funny about the Crime-and-Chase Movie?

The Vogue for “Magical Subjects” and “Mysterious Films”; or, The Duping of Méliès

Figure 7.18: Méliès in America (II)
Figure 7.19: Méliès in America (III)
Figure 7.20: Méliès in America (IV)
Figure 7.21: Méliès in America (V)
Figure 7.22: Mephisto Americanized

A REVOLUTION IN SCREEN ENTERTAINMENT: THE NICKELODEON ERA

The Advent of the Dedicated Movie Theater

Figure 7.23: The First Nickelodeon

From “Nickel Dump” to Legitimate Theater

Figure 7.24: Automatic One-Cent Vaudeville and Crystal Hall

The Nickelodeon Audience: A Class Profile

“Everything Is Clean and Neat”: Cultivating “Mixed-Sex Patterns of Social Interaction”

Figure 7.25: Catering to the “Better Classes”

GLOSSARY

REFERENCES

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